Ammunition
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Always be sure to use the correct ammunition for your gun. Many modern loads may not be safe in older guns. When in doubt consult the guns manufacturer or the manufacturer of the ammunition. If they cannot provide an answer, procure the services of a competent gunsmith.

 

The same caliber ammunition will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, it will also vary from batch to batch from some manufacturers. Different bullet weights, lengths, types and powder loads will perform better in some guns then they will in others.

 

    The casing size should not vary, but the length that the bullet extends out of the shell casing can vary as illustrated in the picture below. It shows the minimum and maximum length you may encounter with 9mm. Using a bullet that is to long for the magazine will cause feed problems, as they may jam in the magazine.

 

All mm sizes are approximate.

 

This overall length problem is most often encountered in European guns chambered for .380ACP (7.65mm) and .25acp (6.35mm), it is most noticeable in German guns made by Erma, R?m and Reck. Some experimentation may be needed to find a bullet/brand that will work well time after time in your gun.

 

Photo above shows an RG-26 .25acp magazine loaded with A-Zoom CNC snap caps we use the verify the loading of a magazine. RG pistols and were made by Rohm.

 

 

    Flat nose, hollow point or other types of truncated ammunition will not feed correctly in some guns, an adjustment of the feed lips may solve this problem. Live ammunition should never be hand cycled thru a gun.

 

    The picture shows some of the different 7.62X39mm ammunition available. The bullets that are on the ends are Chinese manufactured by Norinco, they have a steel case with a lacquer coating and are the longest pictured. A sealer is used around the primer, as with most military ammunition. One has a steel foil bullet and one is all lead, both are copper coated, a good magnet will tell you allot about a bullet. 

    The second from the left is a Russian hunting cartridge. It is has a lacquered steel case and a steel foil bullet. Most all indoor ranges will not allow the use of ammunition that has a "magnetic"  bullet. Some magazines in some guns will need the feed lips adjusted to efficiently fire this round, as it has a blunt tip.

    The third from the left is a good quality hunting round made by a well known US manufacturer. Some magazines in some guns will need the feed lips adjusted to efficiently fire this round as it has a blunt tip and will, with some magazines jam into the bottom of the feed ramp.

    The fourth from the left is South African Military ammunition. A sealer is used around the primer and bullet, as with most military ammunition. It will leave a fun to clean stain around the firing pin hole.

    The fifth from the left is from Finland.

 

Some replacement parts may require fitting or adjustment for proper operation

 

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 Website updated 06/23/2017